CASTLEMADDIE HOMESTEAD COMPLEX

Location

7073 PRINCES HIGHWAY, TYRENDARRA, GLENELG SHIRE

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For further details, contact the local council or go to Planning Schemes Online.

Level of Significance

Recommended for Heritage Overlay

40002

Statement of Significance

What is Significant?
Castlemaddie Homestead Complex is located on the east side of Darlot's Creek near the township of Tyrendarra. The complex consists of three separate sites, two located on the original Castlemaddie Pre-Emptive Right, and one on the opposite (west) side of Darlot's Creek. On the original Pre-Emptive Right stands a bluestone and rubble homestead which dates from the 1860s. The homestead has been substantially altered in the 1950s, with many of the original windows removed and replaced with larger openings. The ceilings in many of the bedrooms have also been changed from timber lined cove ceilings to standard height plaster ceilings. The north facing verandah was enclosed in the 1970s to create a sunroom, and the external walls of the building have been treated with a cement wash. The homestead is surrounded by a garden which dates mainly from the 1950s. A Coprosma repens (shiny leaf) hedge, located to the south of the 1860s homestead appears to date from the nineteenth century. The homestead is in very good condition. A ruined homestead complex and outbuildings stand on a rise some 600m south west of the current homestead. It is believed that this ruin and archaeological site represents Andrew Suter's homestead complex associated with his application for the Castlemaddie Pre-emptive right selection. The third place is a small asymmetrical bluestone cottage located on the west side of Darlots Creek, almost opposite the current homestead. The cottage appears to have been built as a symmetrical two roomed cottage, with primitive hardwood timbers adzed into shape as lintels and timber in the round acting as rafters and bearers. A small bluestone extension has been added to the southern end at some time shortly after construction. No architect or builder has been associated with any of the places.

How is it Significant?
Castlemaddie Homestead Complex is of historical and architectural significance to the Glenelg Shire.

Why is it Significant?
Castlemaddie Homestead Complex is of historical significance as one of the the earliest pastoral properties established in Glenelg Shire in the 1840s by prominent Victorian pioneer families. Although first taken up by the Jamieson Brothers, it has particular historical significance for its early associations with the McLeod family, who owned a number of other important Glenelg Shire properties, including nearby Mount Clay and Talisker, near Merino. Subsequent generations of McLeods were important members of the Portland Shire Council. More recently, over the past 56 years, Castlemaddie has been owned by the Mitchell family. Phyllis Mitchell was responsible for renovations to the present homestead after the family acquired it in c1950. Of architectural significance is the use of local materials to construct dwellings suited to the harsh climate of extreme heat and cold. The cottage located on the west side of Darlot's creek shows evidence of using local hardwood timbers, hand adzed for lintels and timber in the round for rafters and bearers. The later, current homestead has used mass bluestone and rubble to construct well insulated massive walls which are 90cm thick in places.

Description

Continues as a pastoral property and residence

The complex consists of three separate sites, two located on the original Castlemaddie Pre-Emptive Right, and one on the opposite (west) side of Darlot's Creek. On the original Pre-emptive right stands a bluestone and rubble homestead which dates from the 1860s. The homestead has been substantially altered in the 1950s, with many of the original windows removed and replaced with larger openings. The ceilings in many of the bedrooms have also been changed from timber lined cove ceilings to standard height plaster ceilings. The north facing verandah was enclosed in the 1970s to create a sunroom, and the external walls of the building have been treated with a cement wash. The homestead is surrounded by a garden which dates mainly from the 1950s. A Coprosma repens (shiny leaf) hedge, located to the south of the 1860s homestead appears to date from the nineteenth century. The homestead is in very good condition. A ruined homestead complex and outbuildings stand on a rise some 600m south west of the current homestead. It is believed that this ruin and archaeological site represents Andrew Suter's homestead complex associated with his application for the Castlemaddie Pre-Emptive Right selection. The third place is a small asymmetrical bluestone cottage located on the west side of Darlots Creek, almost opposite the current homestead. The cottage appears to have been built as a symmetrical two roomed cottage, with primitive hardwood timbers adzed into shape as lintels and timber in the round acting as rafters and bearers. A small bluestone extension has been added to the southern end at some time shortly after construction. No architect or builder has been associated with any of the places.

The main 1860s homestead in in very good condition, the earlier 1840s cottage is in fair condition, with water damage evident above the doors on both the north west and the south east sides. The first homestead complex is mainly ruinous with archaelogical potential.

3 Developing local, regional and national economies
3.5 Developing primary production
3.5.1 Grazing stock
3.5.3 Developing agricultural industries

5 Working
5.8 Working on the land

Heritage Study Glenelg - Glenelg Shire Heritage Study Part One, Carlotta Kellaway, David Rhodes Mandy Jean, 2002; Glenelg - Glenelg Heritage Study Stage Two (a), Heritage Matters, 2006
Year Construction Started 1843
Municipality GLENELG SHIRE

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