BAY VIEW HOTEL

Location

2-4 MERCER STREET GEELONG, GREATER GEELONG CITY

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Victorian Heritage Register (VHR) Number

H1159

Heritage Overlay Number

HO110

Level of Significance

Registered

80032

Extent of Registration

AMENDMENT OF REGISTER OF HISTORIC BUILDINGS
Historic Building No. 1159:
Bay View Hotel, 2 Mercer Street, Geelong, City of Greater Geelong.
Extent:
To the extent of:
1. All of the building known as the Bay View Hotel marked B-1 on Plan 603775 endorsed by the Chairperson, Historic Buildings Council and held by the Director, Historic Buildings Council.
2. All of the land described in Memorial No. 401 Book 776 marked L-1 on Plan 603775 endorsed by the Chairperson, Historic Buildings Council and held by the Director, Historic Buildings Council.
[Victoria Government Gazette No. G15 18 April 1996 p.958]

Statement of Significance

What is significant?

The Bay View Hotel, originally called the Western Hotel, was built in 1853-54 to a design by the prominent Geelong architect John Young. The three storey structure has a Barrabool sandstone facade with framed windows, balustraded parapet and a curved corner accentuating the entrance. The original balustraded parapet has been replaced with a more ornamental balustrade and the exterior has been painted. The building was used for a short while as a private school in the late 1860s and as a boarding establishment in the 1880s. It reverted to its original use as a hotel in the 1880s.

How is it significant?

The Bay View Hotel is of architectural and historical significance to the State of Victoria.

Why is it significant?

The Bay View is architecturally significant as an important example of stylised Renaissance Revival architecture in Victoria. It is a notable work of the architect John Young, the Tuscan details of the centre row of windows and the distinctive curved corner entrance being characteristic of his work.

The substantial hotel, situated to capture the passing coach traffic, is historically significant for its associations with the gold rush era when Geelong experienced a boom in population and commercial activity. The building demonstrates the emergence of a more ambitious and sophisticated architectural design characteristic of the gold rush period.

The building is also of historical interest for the way in which its changing patterns of occupancy in the 19th century reflect the changing circumstances of Geelong's economy from the gold rush boom to the decline which commenced in the 1860s.

Year Construction Started 1853
Architectural Style Victorian Period (1851-1901) Renaissance Revival
Heritage Act Categories Registered place
Municipality GREATER GEELONG CITY

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